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Understanding Blood Glucose - Diabetes

Carbohydrates are the primary fuel for the body. Without them, we could soon reach exhaustion. Carbohydrates provide approximately 4kcal/gram in energy. When we consume this within food the carbohydrates are digested into sugars and released into the blood stream. This is what we know as ‘blood sugar. Glucose is then delivered all around the body to act as our primary energy source in our muscle, brain and other organs. Not only that, but blood glucose plays a large part in appetite control. To understand more about blood glucose and how to maintain a healthy blood glucose level, please keep reading...

Glucose within the Body

Once carbohydrates are digested, they are released into the blood from the digestive system. This causes a spike in our blood glucose; this is entirely normal. This increase in blood glucose is detected by the pancreas, which kickstarts a cascade of actions leading to a release of insulin. This hormone encourages the movement of blood glucose into storage. This isn’t the only action of insulin; it also decreases fat breakdown/burning. Not only that, but Insulin appears to have a relationship with our hunger hormone, Ghrelin by modulating secretion. Insulin encourages the movement of glucose into storage within the muscle, fat and liver cells.

Before storage and while glucose is circulating, the brain monitors the levels of glucose in the blood. This is used as an indicator of fuel levels within the body. As we mentioned above, glucose is the primary energy source. If the body’s stores of glucose or circulating glucose gets too low, then the brain perceives this as hunger or even worse, starvation. In this instance it would send signals that you were hungry and to seek food. Also, the body will begin to use secondary sources of fuel such as fat.

Most importantly the role of insulin is to keep our blood glucose within narrow and healthy limits, this is called homeostasis. These values are shown below:

 

Normal

Pre-diabetes

Diabetes

Fasting Plasma Glucose (mmol/l)

Less than 5.5

5.5-7

Greater than 7

HbA1C (mmol/l)

Less than 42

42-47

Greater than 47

HbA1C (%)

Less than 6

6-6.4

Greater than 6.4

Diabetes

Diabetes is characterised by the inability to manage one's blood glucose. This may be due to the inability to produce or react to insulin. As shown above, this often means that the blood is saturated with glucose unless treated with medication or insulin.

Nutrition

There are a number of ways that nutrition can help with maintaining a steadier blood glucose. One of which is by managing the quality and quantity of carbohydrates in the diet. Nutritionists recommend that carbohydrates should be included within every meal but spread evenly throughout the day. This allows for the glucose from the previous meal to be utilised or stored before the next meal. Rather than consuming large amounts of carbohydrate and creating a large dose affect within the blood causes insulin spike. The NHS and UK nutrition guidelines recommend minimising simple sugars and predominantly consuming complex carbohydrates. The NHS recommends up to 6 complex carbohydrate servings a day for the average adult. Simple carbohydrates are those found in confectionary, white bread, white pasta and added to hot drinks. They are called simple because of their structure; they are small and easy to breakdown in digestion. These are recommended to make up just 5% of your daily energy needs. This is approximately 33grams added sugars. Due to their simple nature, they are fast to digest and release into our blood stream. This can cause a surge in blood glucose followed by a quick crash in energy. Whereas complex carbohydrate structures are just that, complex. They take longer to digest and release into the blood. This means there is a more sustained source of energy where you do not find large peaks and troughs in blood glucose. This helps the body to maintain healthy blood glucose concentration.

In addition to carbohydrates, nutrients such as zinc and chromium have been shown to support normal carbohydrate metabolism as well as maintenance of normal blood glucose levels. Zinc and Chromium can be consumed via supplementation, or by increasing the following foods in your diet:

  • Shellfish and seafood
  • Broccoli
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Legumes
  • Lean meats
  • Soy

Cinnamon is a spice that has been used for years in ayurvedic medicine as a way to manage blood glucose. Not to mention, studies have shown that just 1-6grams of cinnamon per day can help to decrease serum glucose, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol in just 40 days in people with diabetes, over 60 years old. In addition to another study suggesting that consuming just 1g of cinnamon per day can increase insulin sensitivity. Lastly, a 2020 study gave participants 500mg of cinnamon a day or alternatively a placebo, three times per week. After 12 weeks, the results showed that those taking cinnamon improved fasting blood glucose and glucose tolerance. A top nutrition tip is that Cinnamon is naturally very sweet. Therefore, if you want to start reducing simple sugars from honey, sugar, agave etc, then you could try adding cinnamon to your food or coffee to naturally sweeten.

Introducing our Brand-New Product

Vytaliving would love to present to you our brand-new formulation ‘Glucosupport’, this has been created by our expert Nutritionist. This formula contains Cinnamon, Elderberry, Moringa, Zinc and Chromium. This supplement will contribute to normal macronutrient metabolism and maintenance of normal blood glucose levels. Simply take 2 tablets per day to see improvements in your blood glucose maintenance and appetite management. Each pack contains 60 tablets, for a 1 months' supply and are suitable for vegans and vegetarians.  

Shop Now, Glucosupport Tablets

Reference

Understanding Blood Glucose - Diabetes

Carbohydrates are the primary fuel for the body. Without them, we could soon reach exhaustion. Carbohydrates provide approximately 4kcal/gram in energy. When we consume this within food the carbohydrates are digested into sugars and released into the blood stream. This is what we know as ‘blood sugar. Glucose is then delivered all around the body to act as our primary energy source in our muscle, brain and other organs. Not only that, but blood glucose plays a large part in appetite control. To understand more about blood glucose and how to maintain a healthy blood glucose level, please keep reading...

Glucose within the Body

Once carbohydrates are digested, they are released into the blood from the digestive system. This causes a spike in our blood glucose; this is entirely normal. This increase in blood glucose is detected by the pancreas, which kickstarts a cascade of actions leading to a release of insulin. This hormone encourages the movement of blood glucose into storage. This isn’t the only action of insulin; it also decreases fat breakdown/burning. Not only that, but Insulin appears to have a relationship with our hunger hormone, Ghrelin by modulating secretion. Insulin encourages the movement of glucose into storage within the muscle, fat and liver cells.

Before storage and while glucose is circulating, the brain monitors the levels of glucose in the blood. This is used as an indicator of fuel levels within the body. As we mentioned above, glucose is the primary energy source. If the body’s stores of glucose or circulating glucose gets too low, then the brain perceives this as hunger or even worse, starvation. In this instance it would send signals that you were hungry and to seek food. Also, the body will begin to use secondary sources of fuel such as fat.

Most importantly the role of insulin is to keep our blood glucose within narrow and healthy limits, this is called homeostasis. These values are shown below:

 

Normal

Pre-diabetes

Diabetes

Fasting Plasma Glucose (mmol/l)

Less than 5.5

5.5-7

Greater than 7

HbA1C (mmol/l)

Less than 42

42-47

Greater than 47

HbA1C (%)

Less than 6

6-6.4

Greater than 6.4

Diabetes

Diabetes is characterised by the inability to manage one's blood glucose. This may be due to the inability to produce or react to insulin. As shown above, this often means that the blood is saturated with glucose unless treated with medication or insulin.

Nutrition

There are a number of ways that nutrition can help with maintaining a steadier blood glucose. One of which is by managing the quality and quantity of carbohydrates in the diet. Nutritionists recommend that carbohydrates should be included within every meal but spread evenly throughout the day. This allows for the glucose from the previous meal to be utilised or stored before the next meal. Rather than consuming large amounts of carbohydrate and creating a large dose affect within the blood causes insulin spike. The NHS and UK nutrition guidelines recommend minimising simple sugars and predominantly consuming complex carbohydrates. The NHS recommends up to 6 complex carbohydrate servings a day for the average adult. Simple carbohydrates are those found in confectionary, white bread, white pasta and added to hot drinks. They are called simple because of their structure; they are small and easy to breakdown in digestion. These are recommended to make up just 5% of your daily energy needs. This is approximately 33grams added sugars. Due to their simple nature, they are fast to digest and release into our blood stream. This can cause a surge in blood glucose followed by a quick crash in energy. Whereas complex carbohydrate structures are just that, complex. They take longer to digest and release into the blood. This means there is a more sustained source of energy where you do not find large peaks and troughs in blood glucose. This helps the body to maintain healthy blood glucose concentration.

In addition to carbohydrates, nutrients such as zinc and chromium have been shown to support normal carbohydrate metabolism as well as maintenance of normal blood glucose levels. Zinc and Chromium can be consumed via supplementation, or by increasing the following foods in your diet:

  • Shellfish and seafood
  • Broccoli
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Legumes
  • Lean meats
  • Soy

Cinnamon is a spice that has been used for years in ayurvedic medicine as a way to manage blood glucose. Not to mention, studies have shown that just 1-6grams of cinnamon per day can help to decrease serum glucose, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol in just 40 days in people with diabetes, over 60 years old. In addition to another study suggesting that consuming just 1g of cinnamon per day can increase insulin sensitivity. Lastly, a 2020 study gave participants 500mg of cinnamon a day or alternatively a placebo, three times per week. After 12 weeks, the results showed that those taking cinnamon improved fasting blood glucose and glucose tolerance. A top nutrition tip is that Cinnamon is naturally very sweet. Therefore, if you want to start reducing simple sugars from honey, sugar, agave etc, then you could try adding cinnamon to your food or coffee to naturally sweeten.

Introducing our Brand-New Product

Vytaliving would love to present to you our brand-new formulation ‘Glucosupport’, this has been created by our expert Nutritionist. This formula contains Cinnamon, Elderberry, Moringa, Zinc and Chromium. This supplement will contribute to normal macronutrient metabolism and maintenance of normal blood glucose levels. Simply take 2 tablets per day to see improvements in your blood glucose maintenance and appetite management. Each pack contains 60 tablets, for a 1 months' supply and are suitable for vegans and vegetarians.  

Shop Now, Glucosupport Tablets

Reference

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